Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

This bimonthly department, sponsored by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), presents information to assist nurse leaders in shaping the future of healthcare through creative and innovative leadership. The strategic priorities of AONE anchor the editorial content. They reflect contemporary healthcare and nursing practice issues that challenge nurse executives as they strive to meet the needs of patients.

Personal/Professional Development Plan: NURS 6110F

 

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NURS 6110F – Personal/Professional Development Plan Assignment

Help Info: Creating a Personal/Professional Development Plan

This assignment is due Week 4 and is introduced to you Week 1 to provide sufficient time for you to reflect, research and design a personalized professional development plan.  Why does the professional MSN nurse need a Professional Development Plan?  Purpose?  What should and should not be included?  Where do you start?  Each nurse’s professional plan should be based on personal and professional goals.  There is a reason you enrolled in an MSN program at this point in your life/career.Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

Consider reading the IOM report (in your Week 1) reading list.  Underline each time the report cites the importance of preparing for leadership!  The Future of Nursing report (Institute of Medicine, 2010) clearly calls for nursing to shape its own future, which requires nurses to be prepared as leaders who can lead change to improve the nation’s health through the leadership and influence of nurses!  It is therefore essential for the professional nurse to take the time to assess their own personal leadership style. See Module 3 progress section for info on leadership styles!  Here’s a site with good info.  https://www.leadershipacademy.nhs.uk/wp- (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Papercontent/uploads/2014/10/NHSLeadership-LeadershipModel-colour.pdf Ethical leadership development is another critical component of the nurse leader.  How do we develop our ethical leadership?  What skills are a component of ethical leadership?  These and many more questions are what you need to consider as you sit and write your own personal/professional development paper.  Another help is to read Chapter 4 of your textbook (Roussel, Thomas & Harris). The first few chapters clearly identify the “why” nurses must prepare for leadership.  Next step, review the rubric and start writing!Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

NURS 6110F – Personal/Professional Development Plan Assignment

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Rubric: Personal/Professional Development Plan

Section Exemplary Meets Expectations Does not meet Expectations
Introduction A thorough and complete summary of the paper that includes the main points of the assignment. (10 points) Summary covers main points accurately.  Needs minor revisions to improve clarity, and/or detail. (8 points)Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper Summary lacks sufficient and/or complete discussion of the main points of the paper or no summary included. Major revision required to improve clarity and/or detail. (5 points)
Leadership Skills Development
Assessment of personal leadership style Accurate and thorough descriptions of personal key leadership concepts and characteristics citing a leadership theory assessment. (10 points)Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper Evidence that leadership assessment was completed with at least one personal leadership characteristic or concept described and developed. (8 points) Leadership theory assessment is incomplete or missing.  Lacks description of personal leadership concepts or characteristics using a leadership theory assessment.  (5 points)
Plan for ethical leadership Well thought out and developed plan for ethical leadership.  Plan is linked and compared to the ANA Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, #7.  (10 points) Plan for ethical leadership is completed.  Needs more information on the plan and/or lacks comparison and link to ANA Scope and Standards of Practice #7. (8 points)Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper Plan for ethical leadership is incomplete or missing.  Section is brief without link or comparison to ANA Scope and Standards of Practice #7. (5 points)
SMART Goals SMART goals are clearly written for at least three leadership characteristics/skills identified as needing improvement.  All components of SMART goals are addressed for each of the three characteristics including measurable objectives and outcomes. (10 points)Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper SMART goals address at least 2 leadership characteristics/skills with measurable objectives/outcomes.(8 points) SMART goals address at least 1 leadership characteristic/skill and/or SMART goals are missing or incomplete.  (5 points)
Personal Skills Development
Level of Practice Well-developed plan with goals and objectives for practicing at the highest level of education and competency.  Plan is detailed including timeline for achieving goals. (10 points) Plan with goals and objectives for practicing at the highest level of education and competency is developed with adequate information. (8 points)Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper Plan with goals and objectives is missing and/or discussion is brief and lacks sufficient details. (5 points)
Life-long Learning Thorough discussion on personal goals and plans to achieve life-long learning.  Details include self-reflection on personal meaning of life-long learning and its role in nursing practice. (10 points) Goals for life-long learning are discussed with brief details on personal meaning of life-long-learning. (8 points) Life-long learning is briefly mentioned and/or is missing. (5 points)
Self-care Well-developed plan for implementing and sustaining future self-care activities.  Plan is linked and well-related to the ANA Code of Ethics, Provision 5. (10 points)Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper Plan for implementing and sustaining future self-care activities.  Plan is linked to the ANA Code of Ethics, Provision 5.(8 points) Plan for self-care is brief or missing.  Plan lacks discussion or linkage to ANA Code of Ethics, Provision 5.  (5 points)
Involvement in Professional Organizations

Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

Discussion on past, current or future plans and goals for involvement in professional organizations.  Discussion includes rationale for involvement and benefits to self-professional development. (10 points) NURS 6110F – Personal/Professional Development Plan Assignment Plans and goals on past, current or future involvement in professional organizations with discussion on importance of involvement. (8 points)Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper Plan for involvement is brief or missing.  Discussion does not relate to professional growth or development. (5 points)
Promoting Nursing’s Future Well-develop plan with goals and objectives, for promoting nursing’s future through policy involvement, community advocacy or leadership.  Plan contains professional goals and timeline. (10 points) Plan for promoting nursing’s future through policy involvement, community advocacy or leadership. (8 points)NURS 6110F – Personal/Professional Development Plan AssignmentLeadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper Plan for promoting nursing’s future through policy involvement, community advocacy or leadership is brief or missing.  (5 points)
Organization & Clarity Page count adheres to limits (10-15 pages). Consistent clarify of ideas, thought & language throughout paper. Logical flow from beginning to end; paper is well organized.  (5 points)NURS 6110F – Personal/Professional Development Plan Assignment Page count slightly exceeds limit by only half to one page. Ideas, thoughts and language are mostly clear throughout paper.  There are some minor issues with logical flow of the paper.  The paper could be organized better to improve flow and clarity. (4 points)NURS 6110F – Personal/Professional Development Plan Assignment Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper Page count is not adhered to either notably exceeds or fails to meet page limit.  Ideas, thoughts and language lack clarity throughout paper.  There are obvious issues with the logical flow of the paper.  Paper is poorly organized and lacks clarity and smooth flow of ideas. (3 points)
Grammar & APA 

 

 

 

 

 

Paper is written in APA format with no noted errors-title and reference page, font, line spacing, etc.  Sentence structure, word choice, spelling, etc. reveal no noted errors. (5 points)Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper Paper is written in APA format with only minor errors – title and reference page, font, line spacing, etc.  Sentence structure, word choice, spelling, etc. have only minor errors. (4 points)NURS 6110F – Personal/Professional Development Plan Assignment Paper attempt to follow APA format, but multiple APA errors are present and/or including multiple grammatical errors.  Paper suggests inadequate editing prior to submission. (3 points)NURS 6110F – Personal/Professional Development Plan Assignment

Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

 

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With the growing complexity of healthcare practice environments and pending nurse leader retirements, the development of future nurse leaders is increasingly important. This article reports on focus group researchconducted with Generation Y nurses prior to their initiating coursework in a Master’s Degree program designed to support development of future nurse leaders. Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper  Forty-four emerging nurse leaders across three program cohorts participated in this qualitative study conducted to capture perspectives about nursing leaders and leadership. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze and code the data into categories. We discuss the three major categories identified, including: idealistic expectations of leaders, leading in a challenging practice environment, and cautious but optimistic outlook about their own leadership and future, and study limitations. The conclusion offers implications for future nurse leader development. The findings provide important insight into the viewpoints of nurses today about leaders and leadership.Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

Citation: Dyess, S., Sherman, R., Pratt, B., Chiang-Hanisko, L., (January 14, 2016) “Growing Nurse Leaders: Their Perspectives on Nursing Leadership and Today’s Practice Environment” OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing Vol. 21 No. 1.

DOI: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol21No01PPT04 Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

Keywords: Nursing leadership, emerging nurse leaders, practice environments, succession planning, healthy work environments, multi-generational workforce, Generation Y, academic-practice partnership, leadership development Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

…the absence of an adequate leadership pipeline has been cited as a key challenge in nursing today. The development of future leaders is a vital obligation for current nurse leaders. Yet despite recognition of the need to do succession planning, the absence of an adequate leadership pipeline has been cited as a key challenge in nursing today (Thompson, 2008; Sherman & Pross, 2010; Sverdlik, 2012). We now find ourselves at the convergence of a perfect storm in healthcare. Three million baby boomers born 1946-1964 (Zemke, Raines, & Filipczak, 2000) will turn 65 each year for the next twenty years (American Hospital Association [AHA], 2014). Their growing needs for services will place huge demands on an already challenged health delivery system. Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper  At the same time, many current nurse leaders are in this same generational cohort and will soon retire (Hader, Saver & Stelzer, 2006). Their potential replacements will be an equally large cohort of Generation Y nurses born between 1980 and 2000 who are expected to comprise 50% of the nursing workforce by 2020 (AHA, 2014). With the changes accompanying health reform, these young nurse leaders have a unique opportunity to play key roles in partnering with other healthcare professionals to lead in the improvement and design of the health system and practice environments (Institute of Medicine [IOM], 2010). To meet these challenges, we need to be certain that we have a large enough cadre of emerging leaders in nursing who are both interested in leadership and well prepared to assume the roles (American Organization of Nurse Executives [AONE], 2014; Scott & Yoder-Wise, 2013).Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

…community nurse leaders recognized the value of having emerging nurse leaders who would assume these roles with leadership education and the right skill set. In January 2012, an academic-practice partnership composed of 24 community leaders was formed in South Florida. The project goal was to recruit young nurses early in their careers into a Master’s degree program in Nursing Administration and Financial Leadership before they accept formal leadership roles.Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper   This is a paradigm shift from the historical pattern where nurse leaders have often “fallen into their positions” without leadership education (Sherman, Bishop, Eggenberger & Karden, 2007). With the growing complexity in leadership roles, community nurse leaders recognized the value of having emerging nurse leaders who would assume these roles with leadership education and the right skill set. Dr. Tim Porter-O’Grady, an internationally known nurse futurist, served as a consultant on the project.Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

This article reports on focus group research conducted as part of a larger study with each of three program cohorts prior to beginning their academic education. The findings indicate that future nurse leaders may be reluctant, even fearful, of entering formal leadership roles. Yet, they are also hopeful that their efforts can contribute to improving work environments, unite teams, and implement changes needed to advance healthcare. Their perspectives about leadership before they assume the role provide valuable insight into current nurse-nurse leader relationships and also have implications for the planning of future leadership development programs and succession planning efforts.Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

Emerging Nurse Leader Development

Not only is there a strong business case for orderly transitions in organizations, but younger staff now look for these professional opportunities when seeking employment. Effective succession planning through the identification and development of emerging nurse leaders is now recognized as an essential business strategy for organizations (Kim, 2012).Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper  Nursing workforce predictions indicate that there could be a shortage of up to 67,000 nurse managers by 2020 (Shirey, 2006). Not only is there a strong business case for orderly transitions in organizations, but younger staff now look for these professional opportunities when seeking employment. Meister and Willyerd (2010) in their research with thousands of members of Generation Y found that an employer’s willingness to develop the skills and talents of their staff ranked first in 10 criteria used by this generation to select a new position.Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

Shirey (2009) describes the first ten years of nursing practice as the “promise phase.” She observes that it is during this phase that young nurses are both socialized into the profession but also gain the knowledge and skills to help position them for the future. Generation Y (born between 1980 and 2000) are in this phase of their careers and are ideal candidates for emerging leader programs. Successful experiences in developmental programs can translate into a nursing leadership career (Bulmer, 2013; Titzer, Shirey & Hauck, 2014).  Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper While most of their beliefs and values are not vastly dissimilar from other cohorts at a similar point in their development, Generation Y has two compelling differences in behavior from the generations who preceded them that need to be taken into consideration when doing leadership development. The first is their incorporation of technology as a “sixth sense” and a means of interacting with the world. The second is their expectation of organizational accommodation that is an outgrowth of how they were parented and treated throughout their education (McCready, 2011).Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

Leadership strategies and developmental activities that have worked well with other generations are not always as effective with our newest generation of nurses – Generation Y. It is this expectation of accommodation that has proven to be challenging for many nurse leaders. Leadership strategies and developmental activities that have worked well with other generations are not always as effective with our newest generation of nurses – Generation Y (Hutchinson, Brown & Longworth, 2012).Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper  Turnover in the first year of employment among this generation is a persistent problem in many organizations. Generation Y nurses are less accepting and more critical about workplace practices than the generations who have preceded them. The RN Work Project funded by the Robert Wood Johnson foundation is a longitudinal study that tracks a national sample of new nurses focusing on their career changes and work attitudes. Currently, 31% of new graduates leave their first job within the first two years and almost three quarters (73%) do not receive guidance to appraise gaps in practice or how to respond as a member of the professional team with practice environment improvement initiatives (RN Work Project, 2014).Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper

…Generation Y is optimistic about nursing and may leave employers but not the profession. In spite of this higher job turnover, Generation Y is optimistic about nursing and may leave employers but not the profession. In a recent nationwide study conducted by AMN Healthcare (2013), this age group was the most likely to recommend nursing as a career. They also report more interest in pursuing higher education in nursing. Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper When satisfied with their jobs, they have been noted to have greater organizational commitment than either Generation X or the Baby Boomers (Keepnews, Brewer, Kovner & Shinn, 2010) but are also more likely to monitor and consider employment opportunities in other settings (Tourangeau, Thomson, Cummings & Cranley, 2013). Recruiting and retaining Generation Y nurses in leadership may prove challenging without significant changes in the current structure of roles. Fear of failure is a significant concern in this generation (American Psychological Association [APA], 2012), so leadership development programs that promote hope and encouragement about the progress that they are making is important feedback. Generation Y nurses are just beginning to move into leadership roles.Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper  There are few studies about their perceptions of current leaders and their potential contributions in these roles. In order to accomplish more effective succession planning, a better understanding is needed about motivational and environmental factors that could prove challenging in their willingness to become leaders and accept leadership responsibilities.Leadership Perspectives for Advancing the Profession of Nursing Paper